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in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> reporter: 400,000 in one day? >> pounds, yes. >> that is a lot of fish. >> that is a lot of fish. >> reporter: he's one of the biggest catfish processors in the country and one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to inspect catfish grown here and imported. critics call that a huge waste of taxpayer money. there is one big problem. >> you already have the fda inspecting seafood. >> that's not correct. we have fda but that's a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million just for planning those inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we need usda inspection, too? >> we would say there is food safety concern. >> no. a catfish is a catfish is a catfish. it's a safe food. >> reporter: david acheson is one of the country's foremost food safety experts who says catfish is not a high risk food and the fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> the on
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
was not mentioned. even though in mississippi where i was working, only 3% of the black people were registered. 40% of the population and incidentally, because of our work and working with other people, mississippi had the largest number of elected officials, but now, we're here 50 years later and we find in washington that more than in 1953. more people out of work, but more importantly, we went free in 1963. we need state hood. state hood. >> better jobs, better pay was an objective in 1963. a long time before voting rights legislation would come about, but many are crediting the march to having to expedite that, so what are you hoping comes after this 50-year mark of this march? the march did sort of spur us on and lighten our spirit, but we went to work the next week in mississippi and alabama and georgia, et cetera, so what i hope this march will do is let us know the struggle is not over. there's still massive discrimination, unemployment, gaps between the white and black students and it would spur us on to stop being so complacent, but from my point in washington, state hood is my number on
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
i was even lower than a working bee. mississippi for the first part of the summer knowing that there was lots of talk about the march on washington, not knowing if it would ever come to be but mississippi was the last of the states where there had been no demonstrations. but not mississippi. halfway through the summer, i got a call saying "it's going to happen, eleanor. and buy yard is going to do it." he said, "come on up if you want to work on the staff." byyard us are on the. states who could have organized that march. >> ifill: what do you mean? >> there were a set of skills that we had no reason to have so nurtured. there had never been a mass march on washington that anyone. there had been all kind ofmarchs march. what would it take to organize such a march with no experience, no precedent to draw from. >> ifill: no social media, no flash mobs. with only telephones and the usual old-fashioned 20th century means of communication. on.l, first it took it took someone -- and i think buyard put it all in one. he had been a pass f.i.s.edworln civil disobedience in leavenwo
every hill and molehill of mississippi and from every mountain side. . i'm angela, and i didn't think i could quit smoking but chantix helped me do it. i told my doctor i think i'm... i'm ready. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. i knew that i could smoke for the first 7 days. i knew that i wasn't putting nicotine back into my body to try to quit. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, sp chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get me
was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought with him? let freedom ring. ♪ brown played a traditional spiritual song that he has been listening to since his childhood. it's a piece that people in the civil rights movement sang in church to help them during their struggle. >> in the words of dr. martin luther king jr., let's keep in our heart and our mind and our soul about universal peace, equality for everyone, freedom. ♪ >> well, it reminds me that i have to be conscious of the inequalities that does exist now in the world. >> i don't know how much longer it's going to take, if it's going to be another 50 years or what, but we still got a ways to go, you know, and we still got to kind of keep the march going. ♪ >>> a series of bombs have exploded in shia muslim areas in and around the iraqi capital baghdad. the blasts killed at least 40 people. another 160 were wounded. iraqi authorities say insurgents detonated bombs in 14 places including p
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
person and -- i'm from mississippi. and my parents have worked aggressively in the civil rights movement. my father, reverend james, actually integrated schools in in mississippi. we had the chain gangs before my father got involved in criminal is.tice system. it takes a village to raise a child. i'm using a hillary clinton quote. even though we have come a long way from 50 years ago, we have a long way to go. as for role models, parents should be role models. teachers should be role models and schools should be role models for children. not just one person. >> thank you, both for your thoughts on this historic day as we take a look back and forward. now let's switch gears and let's talk as we mentioned in the intro about -- the affordable care act and the problems that seem to continue to plague obama care. so, debbie, what are your thoughts on the latest announcements made by the university of virginia and made by ups and they won't cover spouses and you can get coverage other places and then -- also, delta comment being the cost that they will approve as a result. >> i think people ar
of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day the -- down in alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor have his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, one day down in alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together. this is our hope. this is the faith that i go back to the south with. with this faith w
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
, in the delta of mississippi. >> and there was a line about marching through the south like sherman which had to be exercised before you delivered, isn't that right? >> it is true that i did have a line in the speech that said in effect if we do not see meaningful progress here today, the day will come, when we will not confine our marching in washington. but we may be forced to march through the south the way sherman did nonviolently. the archbishop of washington -- if i did not delete that part of the speech. and we had some discussion the evening before the march. and later someone came to me and said how is your speech and i said, we have to make some changes you have to delete something. and i remember having a discussion with mr. wilkins and i said roy, this is my speech. and i'm speaking for the young people. speaking people fresh from jails. and he sort of dropped it. and randolph and martin luther king, jr. came to me. and we met right on the side of mr. lincoln. the music was already playing. someone had a portable;÷ñ÷ typewriter. and dr. king said to me, john that doesn't sound
will not be satisfied as long as the negro in mississippi cannot vote, and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. [applause] >> there was no way to know then that it would have the impact that it has had. there was no way we knew he would live long enough to see a black president. >> i cried because it never occurred to me that i would live along enough to see a black man as president of the united states. >> for a black man in this society there was always a need to be cautious about the way you presented yourself in public because you could end up like trayvon. i think dr. king let us understand that you still have to take the risk. i love being a black man in america because it means that there is still hope that things can be changed without mowing down thousands of citizen the way it's happening in other parts of the world. >> it still hurts when other people don't think of you as an american. you're a black american, which means you're an american. if the rest of the country never sees us as americans we'll be struggling with the third march, the tenth march, the 15th mar
the gulf coast and caused massive destruction in mississippi and louisiana, and claimed so many lives in and around the city of new orleans. august 29th, 2005, forever known as the day the levees broke. fast forward to today and though there's been a massive rebuilding effort, some areas still remain abandoned. but new neighborhoods are popping up, and officials say 80% of the prestorm population has returned. >>> now, the picture of a day in what might just be a first at the vatican. take a look at pope francis, who's been quite active on twitter. there he is smiling and posing for a selfie with a group of young visitors inside st. peter's basilica. the people in the group snapping pictures of themselves on a cell phone. >>> we've got good news to report tonight. when folks return for their end of summer break on labor day, a good friend of ours will be coming back to work as well. brian has been given the all-clear from his doctors after knee replacement surgery just over three weeks ago. our own doctor, nancy snyderman, met up with him at the jersey shore. >> i expected a -- may i
, mississippi, alabama, or in iowa along the river or other places in the midwest, we don't ask, you know, why would you want to rebuild that? we stand up for other americans. and new jersey is a donor state. we get 62 cents back for every dollar we send to the federal government. >> that was "america tonight's" adam may with new jersey's most famous resident, almost a year after hurricane sandy, governor chris christie says they must rebuild but at what cost? we will have that story next week. >>> and still to come, a real life ironman suit that's changing lives one step at a time. >>> finally tonight, technology. for most of us, that means the latest app on a smartphone, but sometimes a piece of hardware can profoundly change lives. >> it's a bionic robot called xcel, a battery powered external skeleton that give her legs the power to do this. >> are you ready? >> three, two, one... >> blastoff! >> and this. >> i'm walking, you guys! >> and even this. >> thank you. >> the technology is so cutting edge, that amanda is the first person in the united states to own one. >> the moment she stood u
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
and massachusetts google the most. people in mississippi, arkansas and west virginia google the least. >> facebook wants to get more of the world's 7 billion people online through a partnership with cell phone companies. facebook announced a partnership called internet.org. the company says its goal is to "make internet access available to the two-thirds of the world who are not yet connected." the group's plans include developing cheaper smartphones and using mobile data more efficiently. >> the testing company act says just a quarter of this year's high school graduates who took the act tests have the reading, math, english and science skills they need to succeed in college or a career. the results indicate that thousands of students graduate from high schools without the knowledge necessary for the next steps in life. the data also show a downturn in overall student scores, although company officials attribute the slide to updated standards and more students taking the exams - including those with no intention of attending two- or four-year colleges. >> teenagers aren't going to amusement parks
of the -- and i came up from mississippi where i had been working with the student nonviolent coordination committee in the mississippi delta, and i was standing right up there near the lincoln statue where the people are gathered all on the steps then. i guess post 9/11, you can't have them so close, and i remember that the best view was not when i would come down and look up. the best view was when i would look out and see that the march, which had a lot of doubt hanging over it, would people really come, because there had never been a mass march on washington before for any cause. would they come? how would they be received and here, i could not see the end of the people. march by any measure had been a success, more people for any cause had gathered on this space 50 years ago. >> we thank you for taking the time now to help us remember that day 50 years ago and educate many of us who don't remember it, but know of its power in the history books. thanks so much. our live coverage of the march in washington continues next hour. former d.c. mayor, marian berry, will be joining us live. he
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
that stretched across texas, mississippi, alabama and georgia. david mattingly is "out front" on this story. hi, david. what did investigators find? >> well, first of all, they found 367 dogs. over 100 of them just in one single location. they have arrested ten men, seven of them came from the state of alabama. but this goes beyond just fighting dogs and the atrocities involved in that. they're looking at what they seized here in terms of money. they seized a half million dollars in this raid on friday that shows you just what big money is being had at these dogfighting operations. now, they also believe that some of these defendants may have been gambling as much as $200,000 on a single dogfight. again, showing you what kind of money was involved in these operations so doing much further than just dogfighting. they're also looking at illegal gambling operations and what sort of organizations might be out there associated with this. >> that is big money. what will happen to these dogs? >> well, right now, they're in emergency shelters. they're being cared for. they're getting medical treatment,
. the kids wish network has faced fines before in utah and mississippi. the fines, all those fines added up to a little more than $6,000. >> unbelievable. how that woman sleeps at night and she's there shaking her hand and acting like everything is proper. this kid's wish network, they have been around a long, long time. >> since 1997, and listen to this, this is interesting. it began with a different name. the fulfill the wish foundation, which sounds a lot like make a wish, right, anderson? >> yeah. >> the folks at make a wish actually sued forcing fulfill a wish to change the name. that's how they got to the kids wish network. we found that as quite common, too. the less than forthcoming charities they want names that sound very much like respected charities. >> the bottom line, there are good charities out there. people can go to charity navigator to find out actual ratings of charities. >> you really should. the last thing you should do is have the phone ring and find a tell marketer and telling you what they will do with the money. you should hang up the phone. >> that's how they rais
rights movement. on june 12th mississippi's naacp field secretary medgar evers was murdered outside his home. dr. king delivered his famous i have a dream speech and on july 2nd, 1964, about the johnson signed the civil rights act of 1964, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. both dr. king and his father led the congregation at ebeneezer baptist church. the current pastor of that church reverend dr. rafael joins me. >> good to be with you tony. thanks so much. >> give us your reflections of this day and move on from there. >> it's been an exciting day and a thrilling week, as we gathered on the mall remembering that great day 50 years ago, i'm a part of the post-civil rights generation, born a decade after dr. king's death. but for americans across the nation dr. king's words that day with his soaring oratory, our right to remember it but our challenge today is to make sure that while we engage in commemoration we move from commemoration to recommitment that we ensure that we do not cash in the dream for sentimental memories, dr. king came to the capital with
fought battle in birmingham, in albany george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again, you were there today for the march today. how did being there in 1963 impact who you became no. life. i was 17, and i had a summer job. i was on my way to college and i realized that there were people all over the country who i was aworking class examined kid of immigrant parents but still had this genetic advantage and needed to go down and say i'm standing with everyone else, because it was so important. i went into college thinking i would be a high school english teacher and i said no, i needed to go into journalism to stand up, bear witness and maybe make a difference. >> martha, you've written about the ways in which the women were at times over
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
27th, 1960, we gathered to hear will campbell, a minister who had been run out of oxford, mississippi for playing ping-pong with a black man the day before we had gotten word from the nashville chief of police that anyone involved for the protests would be arrested. there were some rumors that drp the police did not intend to stop. campbell said, you attempt to sit in, the business community, the local officials, and their -- will all put back. they will let police and the rough element in the white community come into the stories and beat you, but it is your decision. they said go home, another man said, go home. another man said, what's the matter? are you chicken? no sooner did we stake our seats at the upstairs common than some young man began attacking the group downstairs. we immediately went down to join our brothers and sisters. violence does beget violence, but the opposite is just as true. spinning itself, pet -- when there's no fear in facing it. obedient subsided. stomping on people, the police conspicuously absent while we were beaten, arrived quickly after the mob wore t
. the mislabeled products were sold in texas, oklahoma, arkansas, louisiana, and mississippi. that one is hard to believe. >>> okay. our fifth story "outfront," president obama's contradiction, has the president changed his tune on military engagement? here's what he said today to justify a possible strike on syria -- >> part of our obligation as a leader in the world is making sure that when you have a regime that is willing to use weapons that are prohibited by international norms on their own people, including children, that they're held to account. >> okay. compare that to what then senator and soon to be anti-war president barack obama said back in 2006 while touting his opposition to the iraq war -- >> i said then and believe now that saddam hussein was a ruthless dictator who craved weapons of mass destruction but posed no imminent threat to the united states. >> so, what changed the president's perspective? "outfront" tonight democratic congresswoman barbara lee and presidential historian douglas brinkley. thanks to both of you for being with us. today, guys, we saw the administration
south carolina tonight. plenty hot in nashville, for mississippi and vanderbilt. up to 91 in honolulu where hawaii plans to knock off southern california. that was a very well-written weather college football -- >> it was. i feel like i know what's going on in weather and college football now. >> who did that, jack? >> had to be jack. kudos to jack! round of applause. [ applause ] from all of us. >>> while we're on the sports theme, let's go to the u.s. open where venus williams its out! >> she battled and battled again in a marathon match against her opponent from china. went all the way to third set, tiebreaker. williams came up just short. this is the third year in a row, williams exited the singles tournament after two rounds. she's also playing doubles with her sister serena. >> before you think the tournament is totally serious. check out a lighter moment there. check that out. it happened during the women's first round match, briefly delayed by the squirrel. unwanted visitor took its time getting off the court as well. eventually tucked in behind a scoreboard. never to be seen
: mississippi, alabama and north carolina are trying to move sea head. but colin powell is among those who claims these will make voting more difficult. >> these procedures to slow the process down and making it likely fewer hispanics and african-americans will backfire. these people will come out to do what they have to do to vote and i encourage that. >> reporter: the justice department is trying to stop the spread by taking texas to court. bill: about five minutes before the hour now. crossing the red line. all eyes on the pentagon. syria said to be launching chemical weapons. the big question now. will the white house lead or follow. martha: the new fallout for the so-called thrill kill after young australian ball player. what the governor of oklahoma is saying about the silence from the president. >> he was such an amazing person. i'm going to miss him forever. but i'm really glad i got the four years with him. golden opportunity sales event and experience the connectivity of the available lexus enform, including the es and rx. ♪ this is the pursuit of perfection. ♪ help the gulf
with teeders ---door key leader us of our allies. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof
.d. law, so ra mississippi, alabama so there is a signal to take on texas. arthel: thank you very much for that update. jon: turn to egypt where two top islamic groups are reportedly seeking a truce with egypt's military a. cording to the associateded press, the groups are willing to stop massive military tests in exchange to crackdown on muslim brotherhood supporters. joining us to talk about this and the larger issues, chris can and political activist who fled egypt in 2011. good to have you on. >> thank you for having me. jon: this request for a truce from the islamist groups, what do you make of that? >> if that's conditioned by the reinstallment of muhammad morsi, i do not think that this is ever going to happen and i do not think that it would be fair to refer to what these muslim brotherhood gatherings as protests. if we can say that the boston bomber was a protestor, there's much protestors as he was. jon: the coptic christians have bourne the brunt of the rage that's issued by many of the muslim brotherhood supporters. so many of the churches have been burned. what's behind th
by the church in philadelphia, mississippi, a worker from boston was beaten to death. the day of this demonstration we have six people shot in washington the same day. black americans right now, young people, we lose 3000 every six months. we have a 9/11 every six months. over 4000 died in 40 years of lynching. we could lose more than that in one year. the priorities that we have are not racism. just because i say that i need tires for my car, my mother gots heart surgery, we have to establish priorities. because i spend my resources helping my mother does not mean i do not need tires. the challenge we face is we are going to give voice to the least of all its children as a measure of our effectiveness and leadership? [applause] the answers will come by going sufferingommunities of problem, and finding out not from the 70% of the households that are raising children, dropping out, but what is happening in the 30% of the households of the people who are not dropping out of school, in jail, on drugs. we just rolled a young lady in going toin teske, college, and for years she has
. a slight risk of strong storms in the upper mississippi river valley. tomorrow, we're looking at more wet weather moving into the northeast, mid-atlantic states, the upper ohio river valley. western half of the country sunny and hot. the heat extends down near the gulf. down >>> good wednesday morning to you. i'm meteorologist christina loren. temperatures are pretty comfortable out there right now. we are in the upper 50s, low 60s, live look at san jose shows you we still have clouds overhead. that natural ac moving all the way inland this morning, means a cooler afternoon. as a result, 70 degrees. today, in san francisco, a little bit cooler than average and temperatures are going to continue to drop off as we head through the nix couple of days. 87 degrees by thursday. up to 91 degrees on friday. >>> don't forget. get that weather any time you need it. go to the weather channel on cable or weather.com online. >>> in the world of country music it does not get much bigger than dolly parton. she is a legendary singer and song writer and actress and entrepreneur. she shared big news with w
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